Mini-megaproject to get an ‘upper-upscale’ hotel @trianglequities @Westin

screen_20shot_202016-09-12_20at_2010-00-53_20am-0via Curbed – Staten Island’s mini-megaproject Lighthouse Point just got another major addition. Developer Triangle Equities is partnering with Starwood Hotels & Resorts to bring a 175-room Westin Hotel to the North Shore. The hotel will be built as part of Phase 2 of the overall Lighthouse Point project, which is being built in St. George at a cost of $231 million.

Construction on the first phase is already underway and will see the creation of 65,000 square feet of office and retail, as well as a 12-story rental building with 115 apartments. Twenty percent of the apartments will be permanently affordable. As part of that project, over one acre of the waterfront will become publicly accessible, and will be used for concerts, food festivals, and art exhibits. There will also be a 300-space car parking garage.

The new hotel, the Westin New York Staten Island, will come in the second phase, and is expected to be complete by mid-2019. The second phase will also see the rehabilitation of four historic buildings and underground vaults at the site, and one of these will be incorporated as an amenity space for the hotel once restoration work is complete. This restoration will allow for about 30,000 square feet of retail, restaurant, and office space.

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#Progress

New York Wheel-thumb

via Curbed.com – Construction on what will become the world’s tallest Ferris wheel is moving along in Staten Island, and Untapped Cities got a chance to visit the construction site this week. Foundation work at the site got underway in June, but earlier this month it was revealed that the New York Wheel’s opening had been pushed to April 2018, from the previously scheduled opening in 2017.

Once complete, the $580 million Wheel will stand 630 feet tall, surpassing the current tallest wheel, the Singapore Flyer. While on their tour, Untapped Cities also got some new details on the New York Wheel project.

The designers at S9 Architecture described a “stiletto heel” foundation that will anchor the wheel deep into the bedrock. Additionally, a 950-car parking garage will be located across from the base of the attraction. That garage will come fitted with a six-acre green roof, a restaurant, a concert venue, and a playground.

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Why is #statenisland ignored?

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ROMAN BABAKIN/SHUTTERSTOCK

via Thrillist – Have you actually been to Staten Island? Like really been to Staten Island? If you’ve taken the Ferry to St. George only to make a U-turn inside the terminal and get on the same boat to go back to Manhattan, then NO, you haven’t. Many are guilty of it, but why do we treat Staten Island this way? Why not leave the terminal, walk around a bit, have a bite to eat, and maybe (dare I say it) even look for an affordable apartment out there? Living and working on Staten Island for 10 years has given me some insight into the Forgotten Borough, including why New Yorkers treat it like the redheaded stepchild of the city, and why we should be paying a little more attention to it. First, let’s get the negative out of the way…

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Rezoning the North Shore

staten-island-ferryNorth Shore car repair shops could give way to 16-story buildings, 6,000-plus residents

via Crain’s New York

The de Blasio administration’s plan to rezone 45 acres of Staten Island’s North Shore aims to encourage new housing, including affordable housing, but it has some residents concerned that an influx of newcomers will strain an area of vacant storefronts.

The rezoning proposal centers on 14 blocks along Bay Street, from Victory Boulevard to Sands Street and from Van Duzer Street to the Staten Island Railway tracks. It includes five nearby city-owned lots and a two-block area around Canal Street to the southwest.

It calls for as many as 2,569 apartments (1,039 of them affordable) and 595,454 square feet of commercial space. Buildings could rise as high as 165 feet, or 16 stories.

That stretch of the Bay Street corridor is currently zoned for manufacturing and primarily comprises auto repair shops, gas stations and warehouses. More than one-fifth of its storefronts are vacant, according to media reports. This is where Eric Garner died from a police choke hold in July 2014.

Residents agree rezoning could improve the area, just south of the Staten Island Ferry terminal, but some fear the affordable housing won’t be affordable enough and warn that more residents will overburden sewers and roads.

The housing would push the residential population in the rezoned area to 6,911 from 32, and the number of people who work there could rise to 2,673 from 1,434, according to city studies.

“Has anyone researched the ancient sewer system?” asked Nicholas Scilari, chairman of the local community board. “How much flow can it handle?”

Scilari said the city has yet to adequately address this and other potential challenges. “Maybe they’re working on it, but we would just like to know about that beforehand.”

Should the rezoning move forward, it would dramatically alter the character and desirability of an area unused to property trades—and unable, in the case of 365 Bay St., to draw tenants to new development.

Continue reading at Crain’s >>>

Is Staten Island Becoming The New Brooklyn With Construction Boom?

8385647686_0b61c12106_bvia CBS New York – Staten Island is coming under a construction boom as the St. George section alone will be home to new apartments, restaurants and shops.

CBS2’s Elise Finch is asking if this means if Staten Island is about to become the new Brooklyn.

Staten Island is often called the forgotten borough, but that’s about to change as a new trio of waterfront construction projects is expected to attract millions of people each year to eat, shop sight-see and live.

“We’re going to upgrade it, make it more better, especially this area,” Staten Island resident Jonathan Trimarche said.

Brianna Benjamin of Staten Island said, “I think it’s good for the island itself and the community.”

Empire Outlet Center will feature 100 designer outlet stores and a boutique hotel.

The New York Wheel, a 60-story Ferris wheel patterned after the London Eye, will offer a birds-eye view of the city skyline.

And the Lighthouse Point Development, which broke ground Wednesday, will feature apartments, restaurants, shops, office space and outdoor entertainment space.

Brooklyn-based realtor Anthony Lolli said Staten Island’s new waterfront real estate will offer what you’d find in Williamsburg or Hoboken for less.

“You’re going to save about 20 to 25 percent, but they’re also giving you a ton more amenities and everything is brand-spanking new,” Lolli, CEO of Rapid Realty, said.

Longtime Staten Island residents said because of the new constructionother people are about to find out what they’ve always known.

“It’s in New York City, but it gives you more of a small-town vibe,” Timothy O’Toole said.

Continue Reading >>>>

Is Staten Island’s North Shore the next Hoboken?

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KATE RODAL Photo: SILive.com

via SILive.com – “The North Shore is the Hoboken of the future. You’ve never seen something like Urby on Staten Island before, and I think the developers landed a goldmine when they put URBY where they did,” said Kate Rodal, one of the first residents of  URBY Staten Island.

That “goldmine” is the work of Dave Barry, CEO of the Hoboken-based Ironstate Development. It’s not the first time Barry has gone into a less desirable neighborhood, built a state-of-the-art complex and watched the area transform into an urban hot spot.

{SNIP}

“I think Urby is the shot in the arm that is going to revive the North Shore. …The North Shore of Staten Island has the potential to be linked to the cultural landscape of New York City. People went to Williamsburg and Hoboken and then to places like Long Island City. …Staten Island’s North Shore is a part of that same story,” said Barry.

“Stapleton is in need of revitalization. It’s an area that has been plagued by crime and general lack of amenities and quality retail. Urby is a sizable project and it’s just the type of thing that will bring new people to the area,” he added.

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Will Staten Island Play Host to the World’s Fair?

largerDNAInfo recently reported that a proposal has been submitted for Staten Island to host the next World’s Fair Expo in 2017. 

The next World’s Fair could be held on Staten Island’s former landfill site, according to a proposal.

The proposal — which would include a gondola — is one of the projects pitched for a new park being built at Freshkills.

Others include a restaurant serving produce grown on farm in the park, a horse stable and riding trails and an indoor soccer complex. They were submitted in response to a Request for Expressions of Interest (RFEI) issued last year by the Parks Department and Borough President James Oddo.

“We don’t believe that those of us in the city government have a monopoly on creativity and good ideas,” Oddo said.

“If you leave it to the Parks Department we will not tap into the creativity and the vision of the private sector.”

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Staten Island’s Mixed-Use Project Makes Big Strides

Amy Plitt at Curbed.com shares this latest development:

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Rendering of the office/retail space at Lighthouse Point on Staten Island via Triangle Equities

The redevelopment of Staten Island’s St. George neighborhood is chugging right along, and earlier this week, one of the huge projects set for the waterfront—Lighthouse Point—got its proper groundbreaking (though construction began late last year).

Developer Triangle Equities also announced some updates to the site, including the anchor tenant for its 65,000-square-foot retail and office component. That space will go to Regus, a co-working space that already has several offices throughout Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens. The stakeholders in Lighthouse Point (which include the NYCEDC and Goldman Sachs’s Urban Investment Group) are positioning this as a boon to the neighborhood, that could “attract out-of-town users who may need short term meeting or office space, therefore positively affecting the interest and patronage of surrounding hotels, retailers, and restaurants” (per a press release). We’ll see about that.

 That office space will join the incoming 12-story, 116-unit apartment building that’s also part of the Lighthouse Point development. When the whole thing is done, it’ll be one of several mini-megaprojects that developers are hoping will transform Staten Island’s North Shore, including the New York Wheel and Empire Stores.
READ MORE AT CURBED.COM

City’s First Farmer in Residence to Tend Staten Island Building’s Mini Farm

Nicholas Rizzi at DNAinfo gives a shout-out to first SI “Farmer in Residence” at URBY Staten Island.

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RENDERING OF URBY STATEN ISLAND

The city’s first farmer in residence — at least in this century — is being hired to tend to a Staten island apartment building’s organic mini-farm.

Developers of URBY Staten Island brought on consultant Zaro Bates three years ago to help plan the farm and are currently seeking applications for the resident farmer, said a spokeswoman for the company, Ironstate Development.

Bates, who has a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University’s Agricultural School, will help Ironstate choose a farmer to take the position — which has a $15,000 to $25,000 yearly salary and a rent-free studio apartment, according to the job listing.

FULL ARTICLE

URBY Staten Island website launched for new 900-unit development

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Ongoing construction at URL Staten Island on Front Street, Monday, Jan. 4. When complete, the 30,000-foot, mixed-use complex will bring 900 rental apartment units to the Stapleton waterfront. (Staten Island Advance/Vincent Barone)

via Tracey Porpora/SILive.com – The developers of the 900-unit housing complex being built at the former Stapleton homeport — recently renamed URBY Staten Island — have launched a teaser website advertising the new community.

URBY Staten Island (www.urby.com), touts “brand new waterfront apartments on Staten Island. Launching soon.” The site invites prospective tenants to “sign up for a sneak peak.”

The development, which will offer a mix of well-designed studios, one- and two-bedroom units, is expected to begin during the first quarter of 2016, said a public relations representative for the project.

“Initial pricing will be announced shortly,” he said.

THE NEW WEBSITE

Once signed up, the website sends the prospective tenant this message:

“We’re pleased to know you’re interested in Urby! You’ll be happy to know that you’re now on our priority waiting list. Stay tuned, we’ll be sending you an invite to a special preview in January to come visit us on the Staten Island waterfront, where we’ll give you a sneak peek at our design savvy apartments and innovative building culture.”

THE DEVELOPMENT

URBY Staten Island is a $150 million project to construct 900 rental units in two five-story buildings with 35,000 square feet of ground floor retail, 600 parking spaces and a public plaza at the former U.S. Navy homeport.

Formerly, it’s developers, the Hoboken-based Ironstate Development, named the site URL Staten Island. It has been rebranded.

“The name was changed as Ironstate plans to launch the URBY brand. Staten Island will be the first of a planned series of other URBY developments set to open in other cities. The next URBY is expected to open later this year in Jersey City,” said the spokesman.

Specially curated social spaces for URBY Staten Island will include a spacious fitness center, outdoor pool, onsite farm with farmer in residence and a communal kitchen with a chef to help residents prepare gourmet meals. The site will also offer 300 parking spaces, he said.

FULL STORY