Boo! Halloween Haunt @TibetanMuseum

halloween-haunt-300x200Tibetan Museum Fifth Annual Halloween Haunt

See you at the Annual Tibetan Museum Halloween Haunt on Saturday, October 29th.

21 and Over. Tickets $75

Costume Contest, DJ Spinning Spooky Tunes, Open Coffin Bar, Fortune Tellers, and many more haunted surprises.

Tickets need to be purchased via our website at

Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art – 338 Lighthouse Avenue, Staten Island, NY 10306

Artist Unite @StatenArts


Borough President’s SI Artist Mixer

October 19 @ 6:30 pm8:30 pm

Culture Lounge, located inside the St. George Ferry Terminal, Staten Island, NY 10301


Staten Island Arts welcomes President James Oddo to the Culture Lounge!

Join us for an informal gathering with Mr. Oddo and the island’s arts community.

Let’s get to know each other  and discuss how we can possibly work together to support the thriving arts community here on Staten Island.

Honk! Tonight @NYCHONK @StGeorgeTheatre


HONK NYC takes over Staten Island’s North Shore!

Honk for Staten Island Brass Band Parade on Wed October 12th Day de Dada is partnering with HONK NYC for a Staten Island Parade and we want YOU to Join us !

It will be a Thrilling Brass Band Spectacle !

At 6:00 pm on Wed Oct 12 the Parade kicks off at the St George Theater on Hyatt Street, Staten Island.

The Parade marches down to Bay Street, past Honor Wines and then on to ETG Book Cafe
with Fabulous Music til 8 pm

Wear your brightest colors, your fabulous feathers and come dance with Day de Dada, Chicago’s mighty Environmental Encroachment! and France’s Le Pompier Poney Club

Can an Aerial Gondola to Bayonne Solve Staten Island Commuters’ Woes?

bayonne-staten-island-gondolavia Jersey Digs – Transportation between Manhattan, New Jersey, and Staten Island are one of the highest frustrations for commuters and residents alike. However, the Staten Island Economic Development Corporation’s latest project development may have the solution. The corporation is headlining a radical new idea to ease commuting between Staten Island and Manhattan through Bayonne: an aerial gondola that drops people off at a light rail station.

The aerial gondola design came from Leitner-Poma of America (LPOA), with the goal of creating a design to better connect commuters to the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail system in New Jersey. According to the SIEDC, the success of the aerial gondola could create a shorter commute for daily users between Staten Island and Manhattan – down to 33 minutes, in fact.

Initially, the SIEDC initiated a competition to find the best fit to carry out the design rendering and the proposed route for the best route to get commuters to and from Manhattan. The competition’s jury – comprised of architects, engineers, planners, and media – determined Elm Park to Bayonne would be the most efficient route from the three route submissions they received. “System length, total cost [of development], and travel time” were key factors in the final route decision for the jury, according to the SIEDC vice president of membership and outreach Alexandra Porto.

Continue Reading >>>

Mini-megaproject to get an ‘upper-upscale’ hotel @trianglequities @Westin

screen_20shot_202016-09-12_20at_2010-00-53_20am-0via Curbed – Staten Island’s mini-megaproject Lighthouse Point just got another major addition. Developer Triangle Equities is partnering with Starwood Hotels & Resorts to bring a 175-room Westin Hotel to the North Shore. The hotel will be built as part of Phase 2 of the overall Lighthouse Point project, which is being built in St. George at a cost of $231 million.

Construction on the first phase is already underway and will see the creation of 65,000 square feet of office and retail, as well as a 12-story rental building with 115 apartments. Twenty percent of the apartments will be permanently affordable. As part of that project, over one acre of the waterfront will become publicly accessible, and will be used for concerts, food festivals, and art exhibits. There will also be a 300-space car parking garage.

The new hotel, the Westin New York Staten Island, will come in the second phase, and is expected to be complete by mid-2019. The second phase will also see the rehabilitation of four historic buildings and underground vaults at the site, and one of these will be incorporated as an amenity space for the hotel once restoration work is complete. This restoration will allow for about 30,000 square feet of retail, restaurant, and office space.



New York Wheel-thumb

via – Construction on what will become the world’s tallest Ferris wheel is moving along in Staten Island, and Untapped Cities got a chance to visit the construction site this week. Foundation work at the site got underway in June, but earlier this month it was revealed that the New York Wheel’s opening had been pushed to April 2018, from the previously scheduled opening in 2017.

Once complete, the $580 million Wheel will stand 630 feet tall, surpassing the current tallest wheel, the Singapore Flyer. While on their tour, Untapped Cities also got some new details on the New York Wheel project.

The designers at S9 Architecture described a “stiletto heel” foundation that will anchor the wheel deep into the bedrock. Additionally, a 950-car parking garage will be located across from the base of the attraction. That garage will come fitted with a six-acre green roof, a restaurant, a concert venue, and a playground.


Why is #statenisland ignored?



via Thrillist – Have you actually been to Staten Island? Like really been to Staten Island? If you’ve taken the Ferry to St. George only to make a U-turn inside the terminal and get on the same boat to go back to Manhattan, then NO, you haven’t. Many are guilty of it, but why do we treat Staten Island this way? Why not leave the terminal, walk around a bit, have a bite to eat, and maybe (dare I say it) even look for an affordable apartment out there? Living and working on Staten Island for 10 years has given me some insight into the Forgotten Borough, including why New Yorkers treat it like the redheaded stepchild of the city, and why we should be paying a little more attention to it. First, let’s get the negative out of the way…


#SilkLofts Rental Conversion in #Bayonne Sets the Bar for Brooklyn-Style Living in New Jersey

SilkLofts EXT Full

Every now and then, StatenIslandFYI likes to blog about it’s favorite real estate projects that are SI adjacent. Here is one such project …

SilkLofts, the collection of 85 Brooklyn-style loft residences in the transformed Maidenform factory in Hudson County’s City of Bayonne, continues to set the bar for a unique and upscale apartment experience on the New Jersey Gold Coast.

Home to over 100 residents, the industrial-inspired building at the intersection of 18th Street and Avenue E has quickly become a highly-desired rental alternative by providing a big dose of Brooklyn style with apartments offering soaring living spaces and an unusual array of lifestyle amenities.   SilkLofts has been created in the former Maidenform Factory which was the birthplace of the modern bra. During World War II, the factory also manufactured military parachutes as well as carrier pigeon vests.

Reborn as a modern, urban living experience, the converted five-story brick building is located just 800 feet from the 22nd Street Light Rail station and minutes from Jersey City, Hoboken and Manhattan.  A separate building overlooks a landscaped interior courtyard and features a limited offering of Artist Lofts.

15-untitled-2950“We’ve attracted renters looking for a different type of luxury lifestyle,” says Doug Stern, President of SilkLofts, LLC, which converted the building and serves as leasing and property manager.  “We wanted to create a building where residents “love where the live” in an urban residential setting that rivals similarly-inspired residences in areas like Brooklyn.   We believed that by delivering a better product and lifestyle at a price point that offers considerable consumer value, we would attract existing and new residents to Bayonne.  That’s exactly what’s happened at SilkLofts.”

A select number of homes are available to lease at SilkLofts, ranging from 568 to more than 1,400 square feet of soaring living space at monthly rental rates ranging from $1,500 to $3,400 – a far cry from Brooklyn rents.  Masterfully designed to reflect the property’s historic roots, homes combine 19th-century restored elements that represent the building’s past – such as exposed heavy timber columns and brick – with modern finishes and appointments that innovatively meld it into the 21st century.  Continue reading

Butterflies are Free


Swallowtail butterflies were among the 24 species observed around Staten Island during the annual butterfly count.

This year’s annual butterfly count was held on Sunday, July 17. Teams of naturalists — organized by Cliff Hagen, president of the Protectors of Pine Oak Woods — spread out across Staten Island to assess the status of the borough’s butterfly population.

According to Hagen, “It is important to continue to monitor the health and wellness of these gentle winged creatures because they are a simple indication as to the health and wellness of our communities. As we move from Snug Harbor, to Northern Seaview, Great Kills Park, Blue Heron Park, Mount Loretto, Conference House Park and lastly Clay Pit Ponds State Park Preserve, we traveled through nearly every neighborhood on the Island. We were able to see the impact of economic growth and development.”

A tally of the day’s observations revealed that a total of 598 individual butterflies belonging to two dozen species had been seen. This was a bit lower than years past. Part of the reason for the low count may be that this year’s event was postponed from an earlier date due to inclement weather.

“Butterflies are so weather-dependent. Too cool, too wet, too windy and the count is spoiled. These past two years we have had to reschedule the count due to unseasonably cool, wet weather,” Hagen said. “And because the flight stage of their short life-cycle is so brief, a week can make a substantial difference in species diversity and census data of our local butterflies.”